WRITERS IN EXILE: A NEW LINK

By a strange coincidence, this piece appeared this morning on the World Literature Today blog. If you’re interested in pursuing this theme, this is a wonderful jumping off point: http://wordswithoutborders.org/article/exiled-in-europe-an-interview-with-three-women-writers#ixzz3DEcJUBTN. See, also, a forum for writers in exile in Canada: http://pencanada.ca/programs/writers-in-exile/  “Home is my language, my country, my soul, and my life is in my text.” Samar Yazbek Continue reading WRITERS IN EXILE: A NEW LINK

BETWEEN SHADES OF GREY: CHILDREN IN WAR ZONES

On March 5th , I posted a reflexion on the literature of war after reading  David Finkel’s profound and disturbing account of the post-war lives of 21st century American soldiers, Thank you for your Service. I have just stumbled upon an article presenting an interesting perspective on the question of war,  its  aftermath and the lives of children. I picked it up on the WORLD LITERATURE TODAY Facebook page. Do take a look . A promising bibliography is provided.       Continue reading BETWEEN SHADES OF GREY: CHILDREN IN WAR ZONES

WHO IS YOUR LITERARY ALTER-EGO?

Because we’re more housebound at this time of year, a recent Facebook posting, on the home page of World Literature Today (https://www.facebook.com/worldlittoday), really caught my fancy. It asked its readers the following question: If you could live the life of any one literary character, who would you choose and why?  Isn’t this a great question? At once, I was somewhere else; in this case, combing my mental bookshelves, trying to find THE book, THE story, where that literary character lives. What first seemed simple and fun has turned out to be a challenge. My first problem is having my thoughts … Continue reading WHO IS YOUR LITERARY ALTER-EGO?